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Record: Elizabeth Richardson, “Homeschooling Laws (or Lack Thereof) in New Jersey–Are Children Slipping Through the Cracks?” in Journal of Law and Education 42, no. 1 (Winter 2013): 173-181 [Abstract Here]

Summary: Richardson, a law clerk at Lynch, Cox, Gilman, and Goodman in Kentucky, here summarizes and comments on New Jersey homeschooling law.  New Jersey law states that parents or guardians must cause children between ages 6 and 16

regularly to attend the public schools of the district or a day school in which there is given instruction equivalent to that provided in the public schools for children of similar grades and attainments or to receive equivalent instruction elsewhere than at school.

What does “equivalent instruction elsewhere” mean? In 1967′s State v. Massa decision Continue Reading »

Record:  Matthew G. Johnson, Kristy K. Bradley, Susan Mendus, Laurence Burnsed, Rachel Clinton, and Tejpratap Tiwari, “Vaccine-Preventable Disease Among Homeschooled Children: Two Cases of Tetanus in Oklahoma” in Pediatrics 132 , no. 6 (December 2013): e1686-e1689. Available Here.

Summary:  Johnson and colleagues begin by noting that rates of vaccination among homeschoolers are unknown because in many states they are not subject to the same school-entry vaccination requirements as are other schoolchildren.  The authors then explain that tetanus has become extremely rare in the United States thanks to vaccinations.  In the entire United States there were only 37 reported cases of tetanus in 2012.  In Oklahoma there were only two.  Both were homeschoolers, one of whom had never received a vaccination and the other of whom had not received the 10 year booster shot. Continue Reading »

Record: Michelle Cardel et al., “Home-Schooled Children are Thinner, Leaner, and Report Better Diets Relative to Traditionally Schooled Children” in Pediatric Obesity 22, no. 2 (February, 2014): 497-503.  Abstract Here.

Summary:  In this piece 11 authors compare the diets of 47 home schooled children in the Birmingham, AL area with 48 demographically similar children from the same region who attend public schools.

Going into the project the authors wondered, given that both homeschooling and childhood obesity have grown markedly since the 1970s, if homeschooled children might be more prone to obesity.  Continue Reading »

Record:  María J. Valero Estarellas, “The Long Way Home: Recent Developments in the Spanish Case Law on Home Education” in Oxford Journal of Law and Religion (2013): 1-25. [Available here].

Summary:  Estarellas, a professor at Centro Universitario Villanueva, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, here summarizes recent case law pertaining to home education in Spain.  In 2010 the Spanish Constitutional Court handed down a major decision that is having a transformative impact on home education cases around the country. Continue Reading »

Record:

Michael W. Apple, “Gender, Religion, and the Work of Homeschooling” in Zehavit Gross, Lynn Davies, and Al-Khansaa Diab, eds., Gender, Religion and Education in a Chaotic Postmodern World (Springer, 2013). Abstract Here.

Summary:

Apple, an education professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is one of the nation’s best-known education scholars and a long-time observer and critic of conservative educational efforts.  Readers of his 2006 book Educating the Right Way will find the contents of this new chapter very familiar.

Apple begins with a basic orientation to the homeschooling movement, noting its left-wing origins but stressing its dramatic growth among conservative Christians in the 1980s and 90s.  His preferred term for these conservative Christian movement activists is “authoritarian populists,” a phrase that acknowledges both the grass-roots nature of the movement and its long-term goal of restoring the vision of Godly and Patriarchal authority it embodies in the home to the broader American culture. Continue Reading »

Record: Caria Celi Chaves Vasconcelos, “Domestic Education in Nineteenth Century Brazil: Aspects of European Influence on the Performance of Tutors and Private Teachers” in Social and Education History 2, no. 1 (2013): 1-22.

Summary:  Vasconcelos, a professor of History of Education and Educational Policies at the State University of Rio de Janeiro and the Catholic University of Petrópolis, here describes female tutors who worked in the homes of well-to-do 19th century Brazilian families.

Vasconcelos looks at advertisements both of tutors offering their services and families seeking tutors in Brazilian newspapers between 1839 and 1899, along with other documentary sources, to make generalizations about who these tutors were and what they did.  Before 1850 men were as desirous as women, but after 1850 the strong preference was for women, especially older women, and an increasing emphasis was placed on qualifications.  Continue Reading »

Record: Ama Mazama and Garvey Lundy, “African American Homeschooling and the Quest for a Quality Education” in Education and Urban Society 20, no. 10 (2013): 1-22. [Abstract here]

Summary:  Mazama, a professor of African American studies at Temple University, and Lundy, a professor of social sciences at Montgomery County Community College, here present results from the largest survey yet attempted of African American homeschooling families, looking specifically at what motivates these families to choose homeschooling. Continue Reading »

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