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Posts Tagged ‘unschooling’

Record: Emily Matchar, Homeward Bound: Why Women Are Embracing the New Domesticity, (New York: Simon and Schuster, 2013).

Matchar is a freelance journalist who has written for many prominent publications.  This is her first book.

Summary:

Matchar’s book is a lively look at several trends among mostly middle class, white, politically progressive young women in the United States.  These trends, which range from cooking from scratch with local, organic food, to handicrafts, to at-home businesses, to homeschooling, are all illustrative of a larger movement among these young women toward what Matchar calls “the New Domesticity.” (more…)

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Record:

Alan Thomas and Harriet Pattison, “Informal Home Education: Philosophical Aspirations Put Into Practice” in Studies in Philosophy and Education 32(2): 141-154 (2013) [Available Here]

British researchers Thomas and Pattison are frequent collaborators, most significantly on the 2008 revision of Thomas’ book How Children Learn at Home.  In this article they draw on some of their earlier empirical research to make several normative claims about informal home-based learning.

Summary:

Thomas and Pattison begin by noting that all children start out as informal, or what they call “osmotic” learners, mastering such complex tasks as learning to understand and speak language and to interpret social cues without any sort of formal, structured curriculum.  Many children go on to learn to read this way as well. (more…)

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This post reviews Philip Brand, The Neighbor’s Kid: A Cross-Country Journey in Search of What Education Means to Americans (Capital Research Center, 2010).

Brand, a young staffer at the Capital Research Center, a conservative non-profit best known for its opposition to labor unions and environmentalists, here recounts his experiences during the 2008-2009 school year when he and his brother took a road trip that led them across the entire United States four times.  In route he visited dozens of different kinds of schools, including several homeschools. (more…)

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This post reviews Rachel E. Coleman, “Ideologues: Pedagogues, Pragmatics: A Case Study of the Homeschool Community in Delaware County, Indiana” (M.A. Thesis: Ball State University, 2010).

Rachel Coleman, a reader of this blog, graciously sent me a copy of her Master’s Thesis she just defended this month at Ball State University.  It’s wonderful.  In this post I’ll summarize it and stress its main contributions to our knowledge about homeschooling. (more…)

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This post reviews Laura Brodie, Love in a Time of Homeschooling: A Mother and Daughter’s Uncommon Year
(New York: HarperCollins, 2010).

Brodie, mother of three, part-time English professor at Washington and Lee, and author of other works of fiction and nonfiction, here offers a memoir of her one-year experiment in homeschooling with her eldest daughter Julia.  Brodie also has a blog on short-term homeschooling that has dealt a lot with school bullying as motivator for homeschooling. (more…)

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This post reviews Lucy Frank, The Homeschool Liberation League (New York: Penguin, 2009).

Frank, author of seven young adult titles, here offers a delightful contribution to the growing genre of children’s literature with homeschooled characters.  (more…)

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This post continues my exploration of recent children’s lit employing homeschooling themes with a review of the young adult fiction trilogy of Susan Juby, whose comedic heroine is Alice MacLeod, a sarcastic and disaffected teen who was homeschooled until age fifteen.  The books, with their American publication date, are as follows: 

Alice, I Think(HarperTempest, 2003)

Miss Smithers(2004)

Alice MacLeod, Realist at Last (2005) 

 

(more…)

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This post reviews Adrienne Furness, Helping Homeschoolers in the Library (Chicago: American Library Association, 2008).

Furness, a children’s librarian, here produces a book aimed at other librarians, informing them about homeschooling and suggesting ways librarians can better serve homeschooling patrons.  (more…)

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This post reviews Emma Stroobant, “Dancing to the Music of Your Heart: Home Schooling the School-Resistant Child” (Ph.D. Thesis, University of Auckland, 2006).  (Available fulltext here)

Stroobant, a doctoral candidate at the University of Auckland in New Zealand, here offers as her Ph.D. thesis a challenge to the dominant medical model that pathologizes the phenomenon of “school resistance”–the overwhelming fear of school and refusal to attend by some children.  Rather than medicating such children and forcing them to attend school, Stroobant looks at homeschooling as an alternative therapy.  (more…)

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This post reviews Mary Griffith, Viral Learning: Reflections on the Homeschooling Life (LULU, 2007).

Griffith, known by many in the homeschooling community for her Homeschooling Handbook: From Preschool to High School, A Parent’s Guide(1997, revised in 1999) and The Unschooling Handbook : How to Use the Whole World As Your Child’s Classroom (1998), here offers her musings on a number of topics after years of homeschooling her own children and being, as she puts it with self-deprecating irony, a “famous homeschool author.”  (more…)

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