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Archive for June, 2008

This post reviews Dawn A. Contreras, “Breaking the Bonds of Isolation: Can Home-Based Education Increase Social Support Levels?” in Journal of Extension 46, no. 2 (April 2008): 13-20.

Contreras, Program Leader at Michigan State University Extension’s Institute for Children, Youth, and Families, here presents the results of a study of the effectiveness of a parent-education program called  Building Strong Families, which offers at-home parenting classes to “limited-resource” parents with very young children.  (more…)

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When it was released a few days ago it cost $29.95.  But this morning I checked and my book Homeschool: An American History is now $21.56 at Amazon.  Just wanted to pass that on.

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This post reviews Helen Marie Anderson, “Learning (and Leaving) the Comforts of Home: A Radical Pedagogy of Homeplace,” in Philosophy of Education Yearbook (2007): 103-111.

Anderson here offers a two-pronged argument.  First, she makes the interesting claim that “where we learn becomes part of what we learn.”  Second, given Anderson’s conviction that traditional families and homes tend to reproduce all sorts of social pathologies and oppression, the only way to overcome deeply ingrained social inequalities is to deconstruct the home.  (more…)

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A recent New York Times piece  by Neil MacFarquhar titled “Resolute or Fearful, Many Muslims Turn to Homeschooling,” while not exactly educational research, does offer some hard-to-come-by data on homeschooling among Muslims.  It also raises important questions for the broader homeschooling movement.  Until more substantive research on homeschooling among American Muslims is produced, we will have to make do with journalism. (more…)

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This post reviews Perry L. Glanzer, “Rethinking the Boundaries and Burdens of Parental Authority over Education: A Response to Rob Reich’s Case Study of Homeschooling” in Educational Theory 58, no. 1 (2008): 1-16

Glanzer, an education professor at Baylor University best known for his work on moral education in U.S. colleges and in Russia, here offers a rebuttal to Rob Reich’s argument for increased government regulation of homeschooling, which I discussed in a previous post, and offers his own proposal for ideal government policy.  (more…)

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This post reviews Eric J. Isenberg, “What Have We Learned About Homeschooling?” in Peabody Journal of Education 82 (2007): 387-409.

Isenberg, affiliated with Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., here tries to synthesize all of the best research on several topics related to homeschooling.  After a brief historical orientation he begins by bemoaning the paucity of available data to do rigorous quantitative study of homeschooling.  The best available sources are the data collected by some state education departments and the massive cross-sectional National Household Education Survey (NHES).  Isenberg uses them and some other less reliable data to summarize what can be known about “how many, why, and how parents homeschool their children.” (more…)

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My book is out!

After six plus years of work, my book Homeschool: An American Historyis officially released today.  (more…)

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