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Archive for July, 2008

This post reviews Bruce S. Cooper and John Sureau, “The Politics of Homeschooling: New Developments, New Challenges” in Educational Policy 21, no. 1 (Jan and Mar 2007): 110-131 (available online here)

Cooper, editor of the recent anthology Homeschooling In Full View, and his collaborator Sureau here summarize legal, legislative, and public-image developments in the homeschooling movement.  (more…)

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This post briefly reviews Bollinger, et al., “The Impact of Food Allergy on the Daily Activities of Children and their Families” in Annals of Asthma, Allergy, and Immunology 96, no. 3 (March 2006): 415-421.  (abstract available here)

A team of researchers affiliated with the University of Maryland Hospital for Children conducted a survey to ascertain the impact of children’s food allergies on the life choices of 87 families whose children were patients at the hospital.  Caregivers responded to a 32-item questionnaire probing into several domains, one of which was education.  (more…)

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In a previous post I reviewed Perry Glanzer’s robust critique of Rob Reich’s argument for increased government regulation of homeschooling.  This post reviews Reich’s response to Glanzer titled “On Regulating Homeschooling: A Reply to Glanzer” published in Educational Theory 58, no. 1 (2008): 17-23.  (more…)

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This post reviews Donya Khalili and Arthur Caplan, “Off the Grid: Vaccinations Among Homeschooled Children” in Journal of Law, Medicine, and Ethics 35, no. 3 (Fall 2007): 471-477.

Khalili, a University of Pennsylvania law student, and Caplan, director of Penn’s Center for Bioethics, argue here that the large number of unvaccinated homeschooled children in the United States poses a public health threat that must be met.  (more…)

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This post reviews Gareth Davies, See Government Grow: Education Politics from Johnson to Reagan(U Press of Kansas, 2007).

Not so long ago conservatives wanted the federal government out of education entirely, yet it was the Bush administration and a Republican Congress that gave us No Child Left Behind (NCLB), a revision of Lyndon Johnson’s original great society education legislation that vastly increases federal intrusiveness into local educational issues.  Why?  Davies, a Lecturer in American History at Oxford University and author of the award-winning From Opportunity to Entitlement: The Transformation and Decline of Great Society Liberalism, here describes the steady growth of federal regulation of public education in the United States from its tentative beginnings in the mid 1960s to its full flourishing under the Reagan administration, showing throughout that both liberals and conservatives have used big government to accomplish their educational agendas.  (more…)

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This post reviews Mary Griffith, Viral Learning: Reflections on the Homeschooling Life (LULU, 2007).

Griffith, known by many in the homeschooling community for her Homeschooling Handbook: From Preschool to High School, A Parent’s Guide(1997, revised in 1999) and The Unschooling Handbook : How to Use the Whole World As Your Child’s Classroom (1998), here offers her musings on a number of topics after years of homeschooling her own children and being, as she puts it with self-deprecating irony, a “famous homeschool author.”  (more…)

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This is my third and final post reviewing Neil Gilbert, A Mother’s Work: How Feminism, the Market, and Policy Shape Family Life (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2008).

In Gilbert’s first section he described the shift over the past several decades away from motherhood and toward paid labor among American women.  In the second section he explained how capitalism, feminism, and government policy have all conspired to further this shift.  In his third and final section Gilbert provides an alternative to the “male model” of women trying to work and have a family at the same time. 

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This post reviews part two of Neil Gilbert, A Mother’s Work: How Feminism, the Market, and Policy Shape Family Life (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2008).

In the book’s first section Gilbert described the long-term trend among American women toward having fewer children and investing more of their time in paid labor.  In the second section he explains how capitalism, feminism, and government policy influence the choices women make about whether or not to have children and how to raise them.  (more…)

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This is the first in a series of posts reviewing Neil Gilbert’s new book A Mother’s Work: How Feminism, the Market, and Policy Shape Family Life (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2008).

Gilbert, a professor at U.C. Berkeley, has a long and distinguished track record working in many fields related to social policy, welfare, and family issues.  This, his latest book, turns his considerable experience and acumen to the vexing issue of the choices women make about motherhood and paid employment.  He argues that the shift over the past forty years away from motherhood and toward paid employment is not the result of women now having the freedom to go to work nor is it a matter of economic necessity.  Rather, he argues that three factors have conspired to undervalue motherhood:  (more…)

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This post reviews Perry Haan and Cam Cruickshank, “Marketing Colleges to Home-Schooled Students” in Journal of Marketing for Higher Education 16, no. 2 (2006): 25-43.

Haan and Cruickshank, both affiliated with Tiffin University in Ohio, here orient college administrators to the homeschooling movement and make a case for increased recruitment from its ranks as a viable strategy for enrollment growth.  (more…)

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