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Archive for the ‘Academic Achievement’ Category

Record: Sharon Green-Hennessy, “Homeschooled Adolescents in the United States: Developmental Outcomes” in Journal of Adolescence 37, no. 4 (June 2014): 441-449 [Abstract here]

Summary:  Green-Hennessy is a psychology professor at Loyola Maryland.  After beginning with a very strong lit review, she describes the methodology of the data set she’ll be using in this study, the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH).  It is a yearly, nationally representative survey of U.S. household residents age 12 and over.  Subjects are interviewed by trained professionals and paid $30 for their trouble, which results in very high response rates (between 69 and 77% during the years Green-Hennessy uses).  Green-Hennessy combined the data on children aged 12 to 17 for the years 2002-2011, which gave her 182,351 subjects overall.  The demographics of this massive sample reflects the nation at large quite well.  Since one of the questions asked on the survey was type of schooling, Green-Hennessy was able to use this data to determine to what degree homeschooling prevents or exacerbates behaviors known to put adolescents at risk for drug use.

Of the 182,351 adolescents surveyed by NSDUH between 2002 and 2011, only 1094, or .6% reported being homeschooled.  (more…)

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Record: Molly H. Duggan, “Is All College Preparation Equal? Pre-Community College Experiences of Home-Schooled, Private-Schooled, and Public-Schooled Students” in Community College Journal of Research and Practice 34, no. 1 (2010): 25-38. [Preview Here]

Summary: Duggan, who has written several other articles about various aspects of homeschooling and the community college experience, here adds to her growing body of work on the topic by reporting the results of a survey she conducted that sought to compare the pre-college preparation of homeschoolers to that of conventionally-schooled students attending the same community college. (more…)

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Record: Elias Dinas, “Why Does the Apple Fall Far From the Tree? How Early Political Socialization Prompts Parent-Child Dissimilarity” in British Journal of Political Science (April 2014): 1-26.

Introduction: This article is not explicitly about home education.  Its central question, however, is an important one for many home educators.  Many parents turn to homeschooling out of a desire to limit their children’s exposure to alternative views of life, hoping to secure allegiance from their children to the same religious and political values they hold themselves.  Dinas’ argument, if correct, suggests that such parents are actually engaging in behaviors that are likely to promote their children’s rebellion against parental values once the children reach young adulthood. (more…)

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Record: Özlem Yurt and Serap Demiriz, “Effect of Home-Based Education Program on Six-Year-Old Children’s Acquisition of Scientific Concept” in International Journal of Human Sciences 11, no. 1 (2014): 1-19.

Summary: As this article is written in Turkish and I know neither the language nor anyone who does, I will limit myself in this post to reproducing the English-language abstract provided by the publisher: (more…)

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Record: Marcia Clemmitt, “Home Schooling: Do Parents Give their Children A Good Education?” CQ Researcher 24, no. 10 (7 March 2014), pp. 217-240. [Available Here]

Summary:

The CQ Researcher has long been an influential publication, especially among politicians and others connected to the United States Congress.  Clemmitt is a veteran journalist who has provided in-depth analysis of several educational issues in the past.  She brings her wide experience and the publication’s resources together here on the topic of homeschooling. (more…)

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Record: Marc Snyder, “An Evaluative Study of the Academic Achievement of Homeschooled Students Versus Traditionally Schooled Students Attending a Catholic University” in Catholic Education (March 2013): 288-308. [Available Here]

Summary: Snyder, who has spent many years teaching in the Catholic school system, here summarizes in a single article the results of his doctoral dissertation, which I have previously summarized here.

Snyder begins with a brief lit review and historical introduction to homeschooling, both of which are solid.  He then lays out his five research questions, all of which seek to compare home educated college students with those who attended private schools and public schools: (more…)

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Record: Christopher Lubienski, Tiffany Puckett, and T. Jameson Brewer, “Does Homeschooling ‘Work’? A Critique of the Empirical Claims and Agenda of Advocacy Organizations” in Peabody Journal of Education 88, no. 3 (2013): 378-392.

Summary:

Lubienski is well known as one of the most prominent critics of unregulated homeschooling.  Here he and his colleagues do not challenge the rights of families to educate their children at home.  They limit their critique to the research and underlying agendas of homeschooling advocacy organizations. (more…)

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Record: Brian D. Ray, “Homeschooling Associated with Beneficial Learner and Societal Outcomes but Educators Do Not Promote It” in Peabody Journal of Education 88, no. 3 (2013): 324-341.

Summary:

Ray is without question the most influential researcher in homeschooling given his many decades of work as the head of the high profile National Home Education Research Institute, a research/advocacy organization that has produced a steady stream of reports demonstrating the academic and social benefits of homeschooling, most of them funded by the Home School Legal Defense Association.  Ray has also for decades worked the homeschooling lecture circuit and has appeared as a pro-homeschooling expert witness in dozens of court cases.  In this article he moves beyond his usual empirical arguments to make more philosophical arguments in favor of homeschooling and against its critics. (more…)

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Record: Debra A. Bell, “Types of Home Schools and Need-Support for Achievement Motivation” (PhD Dissertation, Temple University, 2012) [Avaliable Here]

Summary:

Bell is a homeschooling veteran with a strong internet presence and full speaking schedule at homeschooling events.  In the midst of all of that activity she has also found time to complete a doctorate in education.  This is her thesis.

Bell asks what homeschooling pedagogy might contribute to the literature on motivating students.  (more…)

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The journal Other Education has just published an article Rob Kunzman and I wrote together titled, “Homeschooling: A Comprehensive Survey of the Research.”  It is the culmination of years of work by both of us compiling every piece of research on homeschooling ever written, culling through them all to select the best material, organizing them into coherent categories, and writing up the results.

Several months ago I reviewed Joseph Murphy’s excellent book Homeschooling in America: Capturing and Assessing the Movement, which is a very thorough review of the scholarly literature.  Our article is not nearly so long as Dr. Murphy’s book and thus it lacks some of the detail he provides.  Anyone interested in homeschooling research should read his book cover to cover and keep it on the shelf for frequent reference.  But despite its length and depth of coverage, there are some topics and a few key studies Dr. Murphy leaves out, and he sometimes fails to differentiate between high and low quality studies or between studies published recently and those published decades ago.  I think our article provides even more breadth and does a better job discriminating between sources.  Plus you can download it for free!  Do so here.

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