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Archive for the ‘International Homeschooling’ Category

Record: Giuliana Liberto, “Child-led and interest-inspired learning, home education, learning differences and the impact of regulation.” Cogent Education, 3 (2016): 1-10. [Abstract]

Summary: Giuliana Liberto is a home educator who researched the effects of increased regulation on children’s learning and well-being in the home education community of New South Wales, Australia. (more…)

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Record: Michael P. Donnelly, “The Human Right to Home Education.” Journal of School Choice, 10, No. 3 (2014): 283-296. [Abstract / Modified Version Available Here]

Summary: Michael P. Donnelly is Director of Global Outreach and Staff Attorney with the Home School Legal Defense Association (HSLDA). In this article he argues that the German Constitutional Court (FCC) and the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) have ignored the human right to home education by upholding the German ban of the practice. (more…)

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Record: Lynne Kendall and Elizabeth Taylor, “‘We can’t make him fit into the system’: parental reflections on the reasons why home education is the only option for their child who has special educational needs.” International Journal of Primary, Elementary and Early Years Education, 44, No. 3 (2016): 297-310. [Abstract]

Summary: This small-scale study by Lynne Kendall and Elizabeth Taylor from the Department of Education, Health, and Community at Liverpool John Moores University in the UK investigates the perspectives of parents who withdrew their children from the state-maintained education system due to their children’s special educational needs. (more…)

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Record: Dorit Aram, Inbal Cohen Meidan & Deborah Bergman Deitcher, “A Comparison Between Homeschooled and Formally Schooled Kindergartners: Children’s Early Literacy, Mothers’ Beliefs, and Writing Mediation.” Reading Psychology, 37, No. 7 (2016): 995-1024. [Abstract]

Summary: In this article, Aram, Meidan and Deitcher discuss the differences in maternal beliefs, the nature of mother’s support during a writing task, and children’s early literacy in a group of homeschooled children and formally-schooled children in Israel. (more…)

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Record: Glenda Jackson, “Australian home educated students on self-regulation opportunities at home and in school.” Cogent Education, 3, No. 1 (2016). [Abstract]

Summary: In this article, Jackson, an educational consultant with the Australian Home Education Advisory Service (AHEAS) and a PhD recipient from Monash University, discusses self-regulation opportunities at home and in school among Australian home educated students. (more…)

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Record: Merike Darmody, Maureen Lyons & Emer Smyth, “The home-school interface in religious and moral formation: the Irish case.” British Journal of Religious Education, 38, No. 3 (2016): 249-263. [Abstract]

Summary: Darmody and Smyth are researchers at the Economic and Social Research Institute, and Lyons is a research manager in the School of Social Justice at University College Dublin. In this article they investigate the roles that parents and school staff take in children’s faith and moral development and possible tensions that arise between parents and schools over issues relating to religious and secular beliefs in the context of the predominantly Roman Catholic Irish primary education system. (more…)

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Record: Maxim Doroshenko, “You Can’t Spell Persecution without Prosecution: Analyzing Romeike v. Holder to Determine if Laws of General Applicability May Ever Rise to the Level of Persecution.” Educational Psychology in Practice, 30, No. 1 (2014), 37-50. [Abstract]

Summary: Doroshenko received his Doctor of Law degree (J.D.) in 2015 from Georgetown University Law Center. In this article, he examines the case of Romeike v. Holder to determine if laws of “general applicability” could rise to the level of persecution. (more…)

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