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Archive for the ‘Motherhood’ Category

This post reviews Emma Stroobant, “Dancing to the Music of Your Heart: Home Schooling the School-Resistant Child” (Ph.D. Thesis, University of Auckland, 2006).  (Available fulltext here)

Stroobant, a doctoral candidate at the University of Auckland in New Zealand, here offers as her Ph.D. thesis a challenge to the dominant medical model that pathologizes the phenomenon of “school resistance”–the overwhelming fear of school and refusal to attend by some children.  Rather than medicating such children and forcing them to attend school, Stroobant looks at homeschooling as an alternative therapy.  (more…)

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This post reviews Lee SmithBattle, “‘I Wanna Have a Good Future:’ Teen Mothers’ Rise in Educational Aspirations, Competing Demands, and Limited School Support.” in Youth and Society 38, no. 3 (March 2007): 348-371.

SmithBattle, a professor at the St. Louis University School of Nursing, here describes how pregnancy and childbirth often serve as motivators for young teens to raise their educational aspirations.  (more…)

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This is my third and final post reviewing Neil Gilbert, A Mother’s Work: How Feminism, the Market, and Policy Shape Family Life (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2008).

In Gilbert’s first section he described the shift over the past several decades away from motherhood and toward paid labor among American women.  In the second section he explained how capitalism, feminism, and government policy have all conspired to further this shift.  In his third and final section Gilbert provides an alternative to the “male model” of women trying to work and have a family at the same time. 

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This post reviews part two of Neil Gilbert, A Mother’s Work: How Feminism, the Market, and Policy Shape Family Life (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2008).

In the book’s first section Gilbert described the long-term trend among American women toward having fewer children and investing more of their time in paid labor.  In the second section he explains how capitalism, feminism, and government policy influence the choices women make about whether or not to have children and how to raise them.  (more…)

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This is the first in a series of posts reviewing Neil Gilbert’s new book A Mother’s Work: How Feminism, the Market, and Policy Shape Family Life (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2008).

Gilbert, a professor at U.C. Berkeley, has a long and distinguished track record working in many fields related to social policy, welfare, and family issues.  This, his latest book, turns his considerable experience and acumen to the vexing issue of the choices women make about motherhood and paid employment.  He argues that the shift over the past forty years away from motherhood and toward paid employment is not the result of women now having the freedom to go to work nor is it a matter of economic necessity.  Rather, he argues that three factors have conspired to undervalue motherhood:  (more…)

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