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Archive for the ‘Motherhood’ Category

This post reviews Kathryn Joyce, Quiverfull: Inside the Christian Patriarchy Movement (Boston: Beacon Press, 2009).

Joyce, a freelance journalist based in New York City, here pens an important book on one of the most dynamic subcultures within the homeschooling world: “quiverfull” families where father is patriarchal lord, mother is submissive breeder of as many children as God provides, sons are trained to be arrows used in battle against secularism, and daughters are given a sex-specific home education to prepare them to be obedient wives and dutiful mothers.  (more…)

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This post reviews Jennifer Lois, “Emotionally Layered Accounts: Homeschoolers’ Justifications for Maternal Deviance” in Deviant Behavior 30, no. 2 (February 2009): 201-234

Lois, a sociology professor at Western Washington University, here investigates how homeschooling mothers deal with criticisms of their actions.  (more…)

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This post reviews Laura Li-Hua Sun, “Dare to Home School: Faith and Cultural Experiences of Chinese Christian Mothers” (Ph.D. Dissertation, Biola University, 2007). [Link to dissertation here]

Sun begins by explaining how important formal education is to the Chinese, who see it as a means of maintaining their privileged status as “children of the dragon” over other people groups.  Yet despite this powerful cultural tradition, some Chinese Christian mothers are choosing homeschooling.  Why?  (more…)

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This post reviews Emma Stroobant, “Dancing to the Music of Your Heart: Home Schooling the School-Resistant Child” (Ph.D. Thesis, University of Auckland, 2006).  (Available fulltext here)

Stroobant, a doctoral candidate at the University of Auckland in New Zealand, here offers as her Ph.D. thesis a challenge to the dominant medical model that pathologizes the phenomenon of “school resistance”–the overwhelming fear of school and refusal to attend by some children.  Rather than medicating such children and forcing them to attend school, Stroobant looks at homeschooling as an alternative therapy.  (more…)

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This post reviews Lee SmithBattle, “‘I Wanna Have a Good Future:’ Teen Mothers’ Rise in Educational Aspirations, Competing Demands, and Limited School Support.” in Youth and Society 38, no. 3 (March 2007): 348-371.

SmithBattle, a professor at the St. Louis University School of Nursing, here describes how pregnancy and childbirth often serve as motivators for young teens to raise their educational aspirations.  (more…)

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This is my third and final post reviewing Neil Gilbert, A Mother’s Work: How Feminism, the Market, and Policy Shape Family Life (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2008).

In Gilbert’s first section he described the shift over the past several decades away from motherhood and toward paid labor among American women.  In the second section he explained how capitalism, feminism, and government policy have all conspired to further this shift.  In his third and final section Gilbert provides an alternative to the “male model” of women trying to work and have a family at the same time. 

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This post reviews part two of Neil Gilbert, A Mother’s Work: How Feminism, the Market, and Policy Shape Family Life (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2008).

In the book’s first section Gilbert described the long-term trend among American women toward having fewer children and investing more of their time in paid labor.  In the second section he explains how capitalism, feminism, and government policy influence the choices women make about whether or not to have children and how to raise them.  (more…)

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