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Record: Noraisha Yusof, “Parental and Children’s Views on Mathematical Learning within the Home Environment” in International Perspectives on Home Education (2015): 44-56. [Table of Contents]

Summary: This article is part of a series of reviews on the book International Perspectives on Home Education. Yusof was home educated in the UK for 16 years before receiving a PhD in mathematics from Warwick University. Here she presents the results of a semi-structured questionnaire about how the parents’ approach to home education affected their children’s views and understanding of math.

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Record: Andrew McAvoy, “How Are New Technologies Impacting Elective Home Learners?” in International Perspectives on Home Education (2015): 74-84. [Table of Contents]

Summary: This article is part of a series of reviews on the book International Perspectives on Home Education. McAvoy obtained his MSc in Science Education at Sheffield Hallam University in 2007 and has worked as a teacher in secondary schools for 18 years in both the UK and Turkey. Here he asserts that the impact of broadband technologies on homeschooling communities has already been significant and irreversible.

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Record: Alan Thomas and Harriet Pattison, “The Informal Acquisition and Development of Literacy” in International Perspectives on Home Education (2015): 57-73. [Table of Contents]

Summary: This article is part of a series of reviews on the book International Perspectives on Home Education. Thomas is a visiting fellow and Pattison is a research associate at at the Institute of Education, University of London. Here they investigate the informal development of literacy in the context of home education.

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Record: Deani Neven Van Pelt, “Home Schooling in Canada: The Current Picture–2015 Edition.”  Barbara Mitchell Center for Improvement in Education (June 2015).  [Available Here]

Summary: Van Pelt, who has published occasional studies of home education since 2003, is director of the Barbara Mitchell Center for Improvement in Education at theFraser Institute, a libertarian think-tank based in Canada with a long history of advocating market-based policies drawn from libertarian economists like Friedrich Hayek, Edwin G. West, and George Stigler.  This report updates a 2007 update of the widely cited 2001 report the Fraser Institute published called Homeschooling: From the Extreme to the Mainstream.  The 2001 report was written by Patrick Basham, who has since moved on to be a prominent voice at the Cato Institute, another libertarian think-tank based in the United States.

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Record: Michael J. McVicar, Christian Reconstruction: R. J. Rushdoony and American Religious Conservatism (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2015)

Summary:  McVicar, who teaches in the Religion department at Florida State, here provides us with a  book-length biography of one of the most important early U.S. homeschooling leaders.  Rushdoony is not always put in the same tier of standout leaders as John Holt and Raymond and Dorothy Moore, but I argued in my 2008 history of the movement that he should be.  McVicar’s lively and detailed account of the life, ideas, and influence of Rushdoony confirms me in my original belief and offers a wealth of new information not only about Rushdoony and homeschooling but about his broader significance for post-WWII American education, politics, and law.

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Record: Julie J. Ingersoll, Building God’s Kingdom: Inside the World of Christian Reconstruction (New York: Oxford University Press, 2015) [Available Here]

Summary: Ingersoll is in a unique position to write a book like this.  As a young woman she was married to one of the sons of prominent Reconstructionist Bob Thoburn and was very active in several Religious Right organizations.  She and Mark Thoburn divorced in the early 1990s and Julie spent most of that decade earning a Ph.D. in Religious Studies, eventually becoming a professor at the University of North Florida.  Her dissertation was published in 2003 as Evangelical Christian Women: War Stories in the Gender Battles. This is her second book.

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Record: Kathleen B. Cook, Katie E. Bennett, Justin D. Lane, and Theologia K. Mataras, “Beyond the Brick Walls: Homeschooling Students with Special Needs” in Physical Disabilities: Education and Related Services, 32 (2), (2013): 90-103. [Available Here]

Summary: Kathleen B. Cook, Katie E. Bennett, Justin D. Lane, and Theologia K. Mataraswere all students in the Department of Communication Sciences and Special Education at the University of Georgia. In this article they summarize the research related to homeschoolers with special needs, a population that has increasingly recognized the viability of homeschooling in recent years.

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