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Posts Tagged ‘classical education’

This post reviews Kenneth V. Anthony and Susie Burroughs, “Day to Day Operations of Home School Families: Selecting from a Menu of Educational Choices to meet Students’ Individual Instructional Needs.” in International Education Studies, 5, no. 1 (February 2012): 1-17. [Available fulltext here]

Anthony, an instructor at Mississippi University for Women, and Burroughs, a professor of education at Mississippi State, here describe the daily activities of four homeschooling families, all of whom are part of the same classical education co-op in a “southeastern U.S.” state, which I presume to be Mississippi. (more…)

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Back in June I reviewed the previous incarnation of this book in four blog posts (number 1, number 2, number 3, and number 4).  There’s a lot of interesting stuff in those posts, so if you haven’t read them I recommend doing so.

Myra Immel is the editor this time around of Homeschooling (Current Controversies)The 2009 edition has been completely revised with all new material and a more manageable organization.  As with the previous incarnation, all of the articles it contains appeared previously elsewhere, but they are collected here in one convenient package, capably edited and introduced.  The selections provide various views on four questions:  (more…)

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This post reviews Adrienne Furness, Helping Homeschoolers in the Library (Chicago: American Library Association, 2008).

Furness, a children’s librarian, here produces a book aimed at other librarians, informing them about homeschooling and suggesting ways librarians can better serve homeschooling patrons.  (more…)

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This post reviews Peter J. Leithart, “The New Classical Schooling” in Intercollegiate Review 43, no. 1 (Spring 2008): 3-12. (Available fulltext here)

Leithart, a professor at New Saint Andrews University in Moscow, Idaho, is well-placed to chronicle the emerging classical Christian Education movement.  He has long been associated with The Logos school and Trinity Reformed Church in Moscow (where he now serves as pastor), the seedbed of the movement.  In this article Leithart traces the history of the movement and discusses its underlying philosophical rationale.  (more…)

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