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Posts Tagged ‘Milton Gaither’

Record: Deani Neven Van Pelt, “Home Schooling in Canada: The Current Picture–2015 Edition.”  Barbara Mitchell Center for Improvement in Education (June 2015).  [Available Here]

Summary: Van Pelt, who has published occasional studies of home education since 2003, is director of the Barbara Mitchell Center for Improvement in Education at theFraser Institute, a libertarian think-tank based in Canada with a long history of advocating market-based policies drawn from libertarian economists like Friedrich Hayek, Edwin G. West, and George Stigler.  This report updates a 2007 update of the widely cited 2001 report the Fraser Institute published called Homeschooling: From the Extreme to the Mainstream.  The 2001 report was written by Patrick Basham, who has since moved on to be a prominent voice at the Cato Institute, another libertarian think-tank based in the United States.

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Record: Kathleen B. Cook, Katie E. Bennett, Justin D. Lane, and Theologia K. Mataras, “Beyond the Brick Walls: Homeschooling Students with Special Needs” in Physical Disabilities: Education and Related Services, 32 (2), (2013): 90-103. [Available Here]

Summary: Kathleen B. Cook, Katie E. Bennett, Justin D. Lane, and Theologia K. Mataraswere all students in the Department of Communication Sciences and Special Education at the University of Georgia. In this article they summarize the research related to homeschoolers with special needs, a population that has increasingly recognized the viability of homeschooling in recent years.

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A few months ago I reviewed Joseph Murphy’s excellent book that synthesizes nearly all of the literature on homeschooling into a convenient, coherent, and literate volume titled Homeschooling in America: Capturing and Assessing the Movement.  A couple of years before Dr. Murphy’s book came out Rob Kunzman and I decided that we wanted to do the same thing.  I’ve been reviewing homeschooling literature since 2008 on this blog, and Dr. Kunzman has compiled an exhaustive bibliography, which can be accessed here.  Our article summarizing and synthesizing all of this literature came out a few weeks ago and I asked Dr. Murphy if he would review it for me.  He graciously agreed to do so, and here are his comments: (more…)

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The journal Other Education has just published an article Rob Kunzman and I wrote together titled, “Homeschooling: A Comprehensive Survey of the Research.”  It is the culmination of years of work by both of us compiling every piece of research on homeschooling ever written, culling through them all to select the best material, organizing them into coherent categories, and writing up the results.

Several months ago I reviewed Joseph Murphy’s excellent book Homeschooling in America: Capturing and Assessing the Movement, which is a very thorough review of the scholarly literature.  Our article is not nearly so long as Dr. Murphy’s book and thus it lacks some of the detail he provides.  Anyone interested in homeschooling research should read his book cover to cover and keep it on the shelf for frequent reference.  But despite its length and depth of coverage, there are some topics and a few key studies Dr. Murphy leaves out, and he sometimes fails to differentiate between high and low quality studies or between studies published recently and those published decades ago.  I think our article provides even more breadth and does a better job discriminating between sources.  Plus you can download it for free!  Do so here.

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It’s always a welcome development when a notable journal decides to devote an entire issue to homeschooling.  This has been done only a very few times.  Back in 2000 the prestigious Peabody Journal of Education devoted Volume 75, Issue 1/2 to homeschooling, (more…)

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My article “Homeschooling Goes Mainstream” from this month’s Education Next can be accessed here.  If you want the complete version with footnotes, click here.  In it I describe the growing diversity of homeschoolers and the increasingly heterogeneous forms homeschooling is taking, including collaborative efforts between families and public school districts.

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My article “Why Homeschooling Happened” from the Summer 2008 issue of Educational Horizons (vol. 86, no. 4), pp. 226-237 has just been published and is available online here.

This article is a MUCH truncated version of chapter four of my book–so truncated in fact that as I re-read it I find it very difficult to follow.  About 2/3 of the original material in the article was cut, leaving a product that just barely coheres and reads too much like newspaper copy for my tastes.  Nevertheless, though the prose is stilted and the details thin, my basic argument that homeschooling happened because Americans on both the political right and left found it to fit with their social vision does come through, as does my emphasis on the significance of suburbanization, beliefs about childhood, and changes in family structure. 

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