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Posts Tagged ‘Rob Kunzman’

Record: Deani Neven Van Pelt, “Home Schooling in Canada: The Current Picture–2015 Edition.”  Barbara Mitchell Center for Improvement in Education (June 2015).  [Available Here]

Summary: Van Pelt, who has published occasional studies of home education since 2003, is director of the Barbara Mitchell Center for Improvement in Education at theFraser Institute, a libertarian think-tank based in Canada with a long history of advocating market-based policies drawn from libertarian economists like Friedrich Hayek, Edwin G. West, and George Stigler.  This report updates a 2007 update of the widely cited 2001 report the Fraser Institute published called Homeschooling: From the Extreme to the Mainstream.  The 2001 report was written by Patrick Basham, who has since moved on to be a prominent voice at the Cato Institute, another libertarian think-tank based in the United States.

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Record: Joseph Murphy, “The Social and Educational Outcomes of Homeschooling” in Sociological Spectrum 34, no. 3 (April 2014), 244-272. [Abstract Here]

Summary: Murphy, a professor at Vanderbilt University and author of the excellent book-length review of homeschooling scholarship Homeschooling in America, here again summarizes much of the literature on homeschooling, attending especially to studies of the outcomes of homeschooling on the children who experience it.

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Record: Elias Dinas, “Why Does the Apple Fall Far From the Tree? How Early Political Socialization Prompts Parent-Child Dissimilarity” in British Journal of Political Science (April 2014): 1-26.

Introduction: This article is not explicitly about home education.  Its central question, however, is an important one for many home educators.  Many parents turn to homeschooling out of a desire to limit their children’s exposure to alternative views of life, hoping to secure allegiance from their children to the same religious and political values they hold themselves.  Dinas’ argument, if correct, suggests that such parents are actually engaging in behaviors that are likely to promote their children’s rebellion against parental values once the children reach young adulthood. (more…)

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Record: Marcia Clemmitt, “Home Schooling: Do Parents Give their Children A Good Education?” CQ Researcher 24, no. 10 (7 March 2014), pp. 217-240. [Available Here]

Summary:

The CQ Researcher has long been an influential publication, especially among politicians and others connected to the United States Congress.  Clemmitt is a veteran journalist who has provided in-depth analysis of several educational issues in the past.  She brings her wide experience and the publication’s resources together here on the topic of homeschooling. (more…)

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Record:

Michael W. Apple, “Gender, Religion, and the Work of Homeschooling” in Zehavit Gross, Lynn Davies, and Al-Khansaa Diab, eds., Gender, Religion and Education in a Chaotic Postmodern World (Springer, 2013). Abstract Here.

Summary:

Apple, an education professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is one of the nation’s best-known education scholars and a long-time observer and critic of conservative educational efforts.  Readers of his 2006 book Educating the Right Way will find the contents of this new chapter very familiar.

Apple begins with a basic orientation to the homeschooling movement, noting its left-wing origins but stressing its dramatic growth among conservative Christians in the 1980s and 90s.  His preferred term for these conservative Christian movement activists is “authoritarian populists,” a phrase that acknowledges both the grass-roots nature of the movement and its long-term goal of restoring the vision of Godly and Patriarchal authority it embodies in the home to the broader American culture. (more…)

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Record: Gene W. Gloeckner and Paul Jones, “Reflections on a Decade of Changes in Homeschooling and the Homeschooled into Higher Education,” Peabody Journal of Education 88, no. 3 (2013): 309-323.

Summary:  Gloeckner, an education professor at Colorado State University, and Jones, interim president of Georgia College and State University, here revisit the two questions they first addressed in two widely cited 2004 pieces about homeschooling and higher education, both published in the special issue dedicated to that theme by the Journal of College Admission.  The questions concerned 1. the success of homeschooled students in college when compared with students from conventional schools, and 2. the perception of admissions officers about homeschooled applicants. (more…)

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Record: Richard G. Medlin, “Homeschooling and the Question of Socialization Revisited,” in Peabody Journal of Education 88, no. 3 (2013): 284-297.

Summary:

Medlin, a psychology professor at Stetson University, here continues a line of inquiry he began in one of the landmark articles of the original 2000 Peabody Journal homeschooling special issue.  Since that article he has published several pieces in the journal Home School Researcher, all of which find very positive results for homeschoolers’ social and academic development.  In this piece his goal is to review research on homeschooler socialization that has appeared since his 2000 article.

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