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Posts Tagged ‘Theory and Research in Education’

This post reviews J. C. Blokhuis, “Whose Custody is it Anyway?: ‘Homeschooling’ from a Parens Patriae Perspective,” in Theory and Research in Education, 8, no. 2 (August 2010): 199-222.  [Abstract available here]

Blokhuis, Assistant Professor of Education at Renison University College at the University of Waterloo in Canada, here presents a bracing challenge to the common claim that parents have a Constitutional right to raise their children as they see fit.  He does this by explaining how the common law doctrine parens patriae limits their custodial authority.  He hones in especially on how this doctrine limits homeschooling rights.  (more…)

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This post reviews Thomas Spiegler, “Why State Sanctions Fail to Deter Home Education: An Analysis of Home Education in Germany and its Implications for Home Education Policies” in Theory and Research in Education 7, no. 3 (November 2009): 297-309

This is the last post in a series I’ve devoted to the recent special issue of Theory and Research in Education, which was entirely about homeschooling [I didn’t review my own article].  Here Thomas Spiegler, a sociology professor at Friedensau Adventist University in Germany, draws some policy implications from his award-winning 2007 doctoral dissertation, which was the first ever study of homeschooling in Germany.  (more…)

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This post reviews Cynthia M. Villalba, “Home-Based Education in Sweden: Local Variations in Forms of Regulation” in Theory and Research in Education 7, no. 3 (November 2009): 277-296.

Villalba, who recently received her PhD from the Institute of International Education at Stockholm University (Dissertation title: Home Education in Sweden), here presents an engaging summary of the recent history and current status of homeschooling policy in Sweden.  (more…)

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This post reviews Robert Kunzman, “Understanding Homeschooling: A Better Approach to Regulation” in Theory and Research in Education 7, no. 3 (November 2009): 311-330

Kunzman, well known on this blog as the author of the excellent study Write These Laws on Your Children: Inside the World of Conservative Christian Homeschooling, here engages explicitly the aspect of his work that has caused the most controversy.  Kunzman’s book is an in-depth profile of several Christian homeschooling families.  He only briefly mentions government regulation in it, but that small part of the book has been the near exclusive focus of homeschoolers, many of whom now see him as just another critical academic who wants to take away their freedoms.  In this article Kunzman offers a more complete presentation of his position on homeschool regulation.  Here’s what he says:  (more…)

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This post reviews Carrie Winstanley, “Too Cool for School? Gifted Children and Homeschooling” in Theory and Research in Education 7, no. 3 (November 2009): 347-362

Winstanley, Principal Lecturer in Education at Roehampton University in London,  here argues that gifted children form a distinct group of homeschoolers that defy classification schemes usually employed by scholars to describe the homeschooling movement.  (more…)

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It’s always a welcome development when a notable journal decides to devote an entire issue to homeschooling.  This has been done only a very few times.  Back in 2000 the prestigious Peabody Journal of Education devoted Volume 75, Issue 1/2 to homeschooling, (more…)

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I’ve been asked to pass on the following announcement.  The way the questions it poses are worded makes me a bit wary, for the editors seem to assume an a priori antagonism between parental and public interests that to me feels dated.  But the call is also open ended enough to allow for multiple perspectives on its topics:

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

Theory and Research in Education is soliciting submissions for a special issue on homeschooling. Homeschooling has emerged as an increasingly important educational and social phenomenon, facilitated by the repeal of many of the regulatory requirements that had limited its scope. Scholarly commentary on the normative and policy issues surrounding homeschooling has been limited, perhaps in part because there have been few studies of the nature and aspirations of the homeschool movement. To what extent, if any, should public policy discourage the spread of homeschooling or reinstate regulations calculated to ensure its adequacy? To what extent, if any, should public resources be directed toward facilitating or ensuring the adequacy of homeschooling? What tests of adequacy, or protections of children’s rights, should apply? In contemplating homeschooling, how should we understand the nature and extent of parent’s claims to control the education of their children? What if any legitimate public interests, and children’s interests, are advanced, and which hindered, by homeschooling? What would be an appropriate policy framework governing homeschooling? The editors of Theory and Research in Education invite papers addressing any subset of these questions, as well as historical, sociological, or other studies relevant to answering them. Papers and inquiries may be directed to any of the editors: Prof. Harry Brighouse [mhbrigho@wisc.edu], Prof. Randall Curren [rcurren@mail.rochester.edu], Prof. Elaine Unterhalter [Elaine.unterhalter@gmail.com], or Mr. Mitja Sardoc [Mitja.sardoc@guest.arnes.si]. Deadline: April 15, 2009.

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