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Archive for October, 2011

This post reviews Ruth Morton, “Home Education: Constructions of Choice” in International Electronic Journal of Elementary Education 3, no. 1 (October 2010) Available Here.

Morton, a doctoral student at the University of Warwick whose dissertation is a qualitative study of homeschooling motivations and practice in the United Kingdom, here gives us a taste of what the dissertation will contain, describing how there are three basic motivational types of homeschoolers. (more…)

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This post reviews Charles J. Russo, “Is Home Schooling ‘in the Best Interests of the Child?’ The Supreme Court of New Hampshire Answers – Not When Divorced Parents Disagree!” in Private School Monitor 33, no. 2 (Fall 2011).

Russo, a prolific scholar on legal issues in education who has had several occasions in the past to turn his attention to homeschooling, here examines the legal status of homeschooling in light of the recent In re Kurowski (2011) case (which I discussed here before it was heard by the State Supreme Court) in New Hampshire that pitted a divorced homeschooling mother against her ex-husband who disapproved of the practice.

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This post reviews Robert Hampel, “The Business of Education: Home Study at Columbia University and the University of Wisconsin in the 1920s and 1930s.” in Teachers College Record 112, no. 9 (September 2010): 2496-2517.

Hampel, a professor at the University of Delaware and respected colleague, here provides a fascinating look at a once popular but now largely forgotten form of education that was based in the home.  In the early 20th century millions of Americans enrolled in all sorts of programs by correspondence.  Most of them enrolled in classes with for-profit companies who often promised the moon, used aggressive recruitment strategies, and played hardball if you failed to make payments.  But several thousands of Americans also took study-at-home courses from the nation’s universities.  In earlier work Hampel has given us fine history of the for-profit companies.  Here he looks at the universities.

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This post reviews Yvona Kostelecká, “Home Education in the Post Communist Countries: Case Study of the Czech Republic” in International Electronic Journal of Elementary Education, 3, no. 1 (October 2010).  Available Here.

Kostelecká, a member of the education faculty at Charles University in Prague, here tries to get purchase on homeschooling in the wider world of post-Communist Eastern Europe by looking in detail at the Czech Republic.  Her conclusion?  It’s legal but rare and heavily regulated.

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Recently a reader named Anthony Garcia, who writes for the website Online Graduate Programs, contacted me and asked if he could review some studies that deal with homeschool burnout.  I said sure.  His reviews stress the practical lessons homeschoolers might draw from the research rather then research findings and methodology like I normally do, and they’re not really about burnout, but here goes:

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