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Archive for the ‘Homeschooling in Literature and Film’ Category

This post briefly reviews Rebecca Stead, Liar & Spy (New York: Wendy Lamb Books, 2012)

Stead, author of the Newberry Award winning When You Reach Me, has recently published her third novel for children.  I’m reviewing it here because, like many other children’s books, it has some homeschooled characters. (more…)

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This post reviews Quinn Cummings, The Year of Learning Dangerously: Adventures in Homeschooling (New York: Penguin, 2012).

I decided that since this book has been getting so much media attention I should review it.  Cummings is a fascinating woman–Academy Award nominated child star, prolific blogger, and author of now two entertaining memoirs.  This book, her most recent memoir, has been featured on the Diane Rehm Show, in Time Magazine, on Fox News, and all over the internet.

What, if anything, does it offer to homeschool researchers?  Well, first it offers a lot of fun.  (more…)

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This post reviews Deb Esposito, World War Me: Soul Survivor(Cresco, PA: Monty Media, 2012).

In earlier reviews of children’s literature I have frequently had occasion to note that though conservative Christians make up the lion’s share of homeschoolers in this country, almost every piece of children’s lit that has homeschooling characters tends to feature the small minority who are drawn to the practice for more secular reasons ranging from hippie-type rejections of formalism and desire to live in nature to concerns for a child’s health.

Well, here is a book about Christian homeschooling.  (more…)

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This post reviews R. J. Palacio’s children’s book Wonder (Knopf, 2012).

I’ve reviewed a lot of children’s books with homeschooling themes on this blog over the years.  This one may be my favorite.  August Pullman is a boy born with serious, serious face abnormalities, so much so that his parents homeschool him until the fifth grade to protect him somewhat from the constant shocked looks and whispered conversations that follow him wherever he goes.  But for the fifth grade they decide it’s time he starts learning how to live in the real world a bit, so they send him to school.

(more…)

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Lisa Tucker is a fairly well known and respected American novelist.  The Winters in Bloom is her sixth book.  In her 2007 work Once Upon a Day, Tucker had explored the themes of kidnapping and raising children in protected isolation from the rest of the world.  Here she returns to these same ideas.  Her protagonists, Kyra and David Winter, have a five-year-old son named Michael over whom they hover obsessively.  Their desire to protect Michael from bullying, not to mention dust, mass media, unhealthy food, and any number of other perils, lead them to homeschooling.

(more…)

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This post briefly reviews Beth Kephart’s young adult novel You Are My Only.

Kephart is an award-winning author of 13 young adult titles as well as lots of poetry, essays, and reviews.  This, her latest book, is up for review here because of its use of homeschooling as a plot point. (more…)

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Mary Clearman Blew is an English professor at the University of Idaho.  She has written a lot of books and stories, most of them autobiographical.  This latest collection is a series of autobiographical tales, most of whose chapters had appeared in print elsewhere as independent essays.

I review it because in addition to being eminently readable it includes a few juicy sections on life as a “home schooler” of sorts in rural Montana during the 1940s.  (more…)

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