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Archive for November, 2012

This post reviews Bruce Stafford, “Bad Evidence: the Curious Case of the Government-Commissioned Review of Elective Home Education in England and How Parents Exposed its Weaknesses” in Evidence and Policy 8, no. 3 (August 2012): 361-381. [Abstract Here]

Stafford, a Professor of Public Policy at the University of Nottingham in the United Kingdom, here relates the remarkable story of how a group of home educators succeeded in undermining the status of a high-profile report on home education commissioned by England’s Department for Children, Schools, and Families (DCSF).  Stafford is interested in this story not because of home education but because of what it reveals about the flaws in the government’s tendency to farm out its research needs to private entities absent any sort of rigorous peer-review system.  Stafford himself, so far as I can tell, is not a homeschooling insider.  He’s an expert on various elements of government social policy, especially Disability Services.  He’s also done a good bit of contract work for the government himself, which might explain his interest in this particular case.  Here’s the story: (more…)

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This post reviews Alan Thomas and Allison Wray, “School Refusal and Home Education” in Journal of Unschooling and Alternative Learning 7, no. 13 (2013).[Available Here]

Thomas, a well-known authority on home education in Britain and Visiting Fellow at the University of London Institute of Education, and Wray, graduate student at Cambridge University and mother of three children, two of whom had refused school, here present the results of a recent study of twenty-four children who had refused to attend school and whose families turned to home-based learning as an alternative. (more…)

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This post reviews Hilary Cooper, “Looking Backwards to Move Forwards: Charlotte Mason on History” in Curriculum Journal 23: 1 (2012), pp. 7-18.

Cooper, a member of the education faculty at the University of Cumbria, Carlisle, UK, here uses Charlotte Mason’s views of history education to critique trends in the British government’s approach to the issue. (more…)

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