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Archive for August, 2011

This post reviews Paul A. Alarcón, “Recognizing and Regulating Home Schooling in California: Balancing Parental and State Interests in Education” in Chapman Law Review, 13 (2010): 391-416.

Alarcón, about whom I was unable to find any information on the web, here presents a summary of the recent In re Rachel L. and Jonathan L. decisions in California and an argument that the California legislature should pass new legislation that explicitly gives parents a right to homeschool but requires that they submit annual notification of intent to homeschool and annual standardized test scores.

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This post reviews Courtenay E. Moran, “How to Regulate Homeschooling: Why History Supports the Theory of Parental Choice” in University of illinois Law Review, 2011, no. 3 (2011): 1061-1094. [Available Here]

Moran, a J. D. candidate at the University of Illinois College of Law and former homeschooler himself, here offers an ambitious, historically-grounded legal argument for the viability of limited goverment regulation of homeschooling.

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This post reviews Consuelo Valenzuela Lickstein, “Race and Education at a Crossroads: How Parents Involved in Community Schools v. Seattle School District No. 1 and Wisconsin v. Yoder Shed Light on the Potential Conflict Between the Black Homeschooling Movement and K-12 Affirmative Action Programs” in The Journal of Gender, Race and Justice 13 (Spring 2010): 835-857.

Lickstein, an associate at Choate Hall and Stewart LLP and recent graduate of University of Iowa College of Law, here presents an interesting thought experiment about homeschooling and diversity in public schools.

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This post reviews Catherina Groeneveld, “Judicial Constructions of Compulsory Schooling in Germany.”  M.A. Thesis, National University of Ireland, 2010.

Groeneveld, a reader of this blog, recently defended this thesis and graciously sent it to me for review.  Its aim is to explain why German judges, despite a gradual softening of the German public toward homeschooling, continue to hand down decisions that condemn the practice.

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