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Archive for March, 2013

A few minutes ago I published my latest review of some homeschooling literature at the International Center for Home Education Research Reviews Section.  I’ve finally gotten the technology right so that readers who are following my facebook page will automatically receive an update whenever I post a new review.

This may be the final post I make to this particular blog.  If you have somehow stumbled upon this site and would like to read my more recent reviews, this link will take you to the reviews section of ICHER.  Thanks to everyone for many wonderful years of blogging and interacting with readers!

Milton Gaither

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I’m trying to make the transition from this site to the Reviews section of the International Center for Home Education Research website.  I thought I had set it up so that my readers who have joined my facebook group Homeschooling Research Reviews would be able to get an automatic notification of new posts.  But it didn’t happen the way I hoped it would.  Until I get the technology fixed, I’ll post links here as well.

The new post reviews a fascinating doctoral dissertation about the legislative and legal situation concerning homeschooling both in the United States and Canada.  While the U.S. stuff is pretty familiar to most readers, the Canadian material was, at least to me, completely fresh and very enlightening.  Read the new post here.

 

 

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This is the second of two posts dedicated to Jennifer Lois’ new book Home Is Where the School Is: The Logic of Homeschooling and the Emotional Labor of Mothering(New York University Press, 2013).  In the first, which you can read here, I summarized the contents of the book.  Today I will share some of the thoughts I had as I was reading it.

First, a general comment about the quality of homeschooling scholarship.  Before I published my book in 2008 there was only one really good book on homeschooling in print, Mitchell Stevens’ Kingdom of Children: Culture and Controversy in the Homeschooling Movement.  Now there are five.  In addition to Stevens’ and mine, all researchers should read Kunzman’s Write These Laws on Your Children, Murphy’s Homeschooling in America, and now Lois’ Home Is Where the School Is.  The field is in a much better place now than it was when I first got started, and Lois’ book adds significantly to our overall understanding.  Here I’m going to discuss two insights I found particularly compelling and conclude with a few criticisms.

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This is the first of two posts dedicated to Jennifer Lois’ new book Home Is Where the School Is: The Logic of Homeschooling and the Emotional Labor of Mothering(New York University Press, 2013).

Lois, a sociology professor at Western Washington University, has published two articles on the subject of the emotional lives of homeschooling mothers that I reviewed here and here.  Twelve years in the making, this book represents the culmination of this line of research for her.  Oftentimes the articles that are published prior to books contain most of what the researcher has to say.  That is happily not the case here.  The book contains a wealth of new findings and interpretations.  In this first post I’ll summarize the book’s contents, and next week I’ll make some comments about Lois’ methods, findings, and interpretations.

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A few months ago I reviewed Joseph Murphy’s excellent book that synthesizes nearly all of the literature on homeschooling into a convenient, coherent, and literate volume titled Homeschooling in America: Capturing and Assessing the Movement.  A couple of years before Dr. Murphy’s book came out Rob Kunzman and I decided that we wanted to do the same thing.  I’ve been reviewing homeschooling literature since 2008 on this blog, and Dr. Kunzman has compiled an exhaustive bibliography, which can be accessed here.  Our article summarizing and synthesizing all of this literature came out a few weeks ago and I asked Dr. Murphy if he would review it for me.  He graciously agreed to do so, and here are his comments: (more…)

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